8 Signs Your Eating is Disordered

Posted on April 11, 2014 By

8 Signs Your Eating is Disordered

Disordered eating is its own diagnosis and is sort of an umbrella term to describe a wide range of irregular eating behaviors that don’t fit the specific and narrow criteria for certain, already established eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. You’re eating habits might be considered disordered if they mirror several but not all of the symptoms of other eating disorders, like anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, or an Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). Here are 8 signs your eating is disordered.

8 Signs Your Eating is Disordered

Disordered eating and dieting behavior are the most common indicators of the development of an eating disorder. Eating disorders are severe and life threatening mental illnesses. An eating disorder is not a lifestyle choice.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #1: You fast or adhere to a very strict diet

Fasting or chronic restrained eating is probably the number one indication of disordered eating. If you are very regimented in how you eat, what you eat, and when you eat, this is an obvious sign that you are experiencing very rigid thoughts about food. For example, you have beliefs about which foods are ‘good’ and which are ‘bad.’ You punish or reward yourself with certain foods or by withholding specific foods.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #2: You skip meals

If you are constantly skipping meals, this is also a major sign that your eating is disordered. Many people who have unhealthy thoughts and behaviors about food will often intentionally skip meals as a way to cut down on their daily caloric intake.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #3: You’re binge eating  

Disordered eating isn’t just about restricting food. It can also refer to overeating and binge eating. Binge eating is described as such: when a person eats a much larger amount of food in a shorter period of time than they normally would and feels a loss of control.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #4: You’re using laxatives, diuretics, or enemas

This is a trick people with distorted beliefs about food and their bodies will use to shed weight quickly. This is a very dangerous practice.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #5: You’re using diet pills

Women with disordered eating with abuse either over-the-counter or even resort to more powerful, and possibly illegal substances, such as amphetamines. This, of course, is also very dangerous. And not to mention, breaking your sobriety.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #6: You’ve resorted to steroids and creatine

Another sign that your eating is disordered is if you’re using drugs and other supplements that are designed to not only improve physical performance, such as working out at the gym, but are also used to alter physical appearance. Again, using substances in this way, and especially ones like steroids, is considered by many as a relapse.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #7: Your meals are purposely unbalanced

For example, many people with the more extreme form of the eating disorder anorexia will restrict or completely cut out a major food group such as ‘fatty’ foods or carbohydrates. This is also a sign that your eating is disordered, just perhaps not to the same extent as someone who fits the criteria for anorexia nervosa.

Signs Your Eating is Disordered #8: You make yourself throw up

Especially after binge eating, as is seen in cases of bulimia.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse, addiction, or issues related to disordered eating, please call toll-free 1-800-777-9588.


8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

Posted on April 10, 2014 By
8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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OK, so here’s the thing. Everybody lies at some time or another. Sometimes it’s a little white lie to protect someone else’s feelings. Sometimes it’s a big fat lie. When it comes to how we treat ourselves, however, we seldom lie to protect our feelings, in fact we lie to ourselves a lot about how much we suck and how talentless, stupid, ugly, etc. etc. we are. Well, it’s time to give that crap up. #RealTalk.

Here are 8 things – which are totally awesome – that happen when you quit lying to yourself.

#1. You can trust yourself

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Remember what it was like in active addiction, when you didn’t know up from down, tails from heads? Besides the foggy effect that the alcohol and other drugs were having on your brain, a lot of this came from the constant lying to yourself (i.e. denial).  When you quit lying to yourself, though, you start to learn to trust yourself. Which is totally a good thing.

#2. You feel like a proud, virtuous woman

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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I mean, who wouldn’t want to feel this way? And, we don’t mean in a stuck-up way. For far too long, we walked with our heads hung low from the guilt and shame (see #3) of using and lying to both ourselves and others. Now, we can walk with our heads high.

#3. You don’t feel shameful

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Lying to yourself is like constantly walking around with a guilty conscience and, no matter how much you think you’re hiding this part of you from others, it’s written all over you – in your body language, the way you carry yourself, how you treat yourself which spills over to how you treat others. When you decide to quit lying to yourself, you will no longer walk around, cloaked in shame.

#4. You gain self-respect and self-worth

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Again, when you stop lying to yourself, you will naturally gain a sense of respect for yourself as well as realize that you are worth way more than you’ve been telling yourself all these years. You’re worthy so start believing it.

#5. You gain a sense of inner peace

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Lying to yourself is one way that inner turmoil and mental anguish show up. Therefore, when you break yourself of the habit of telling yourself all of those terrible lies, you will experience inner peace and happiness, perhaps for the first time in a long time.

#6. You embrace your potential

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Once you let go of all of those lies and self-limiting beliefs, you will start to believe in yourself – in your dreams, aspirations, and abilities. And, once you start believing, you will start achieving.

#7. You can experience self-acceptance

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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With self-worth, self-respect, and inner peace come an overall experience of self-acceptance. And being able to accept and love yourself for who you are will extend to how you feel about and treat others.

#8. You can be true to yourself, which brings freedom

8 (Awesome) Things That Happen When You Quit Lying to Yourself

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Ahhh, perhaps the most awesome thing that happens when you quit lying to yourself is that you will have a personal freedom that you never had before. Being true to yourself and living joyfully and unapologetically is probably the ultimate level in the game of life. Congrats! #YouWinAtLife.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-777-9588.


American Psychiatric Association Officially Confirms Taking “Selfies” a Mental Disorder?

Posted on April 9, 2014 By

American Psychiatric Association Officially Confirms Taking "Selfies" a Mental Disorder?

The Adobo Chronicles reported last week that the American Psychiatric Association (APA) formally recognized the excessive taking of “selfies” as a psychological problem by classifying it as a mental disorder and calling it selfitis.

The article went on to discuss the semantics that were being debated reporting that the medical community is criticizing APA’s use of the term ‘selfitis,’ saying that the term given is incorrect because  the suffix -itis refers to a disease that involves inflammation. The article goes on to say that doctors and scientists are arguing for the term should be ‘selfism,’ because, like the addiction to alcohol is alcoholism, the addiction to take self-photos should end in -ism.

To which the APA responded by defending its choice in naming the condition ‘selfitis’ because it is a disorder in which the person suffers from an ‘inflammation of one’s ego.’

Another site went on to describe how the APA even classified the different levels of severity of the so-called ‘selfitis’ disorder, stating that:

  • Borderline selfitis is described as the taking photos of one’s self at least three times a day but not posting them on social media
  • Acute selfitis is described as the taking photos of one’s self at least three times a day and posting each of the photos on social media and
  • Chronic selfitis is the uncontrollable urge to take photos of one’s self  round the clock and posting the photos on social media more than six times a day

So, did the American Psychiatric Association officially confirm Taking “Selfies” a Mental Disorder?

This kind of sounds like it might possibly have some basis in reality although at the same time it sounds pretty far-fetched. If you were leaning towards far-fetched, congratulations – you saw through the bullsh*t. This is a hoax. But what about the story is possibly rooted in reality?

Well, first of all, it’s difficult to ignore the “selfie” trend. Everybody’s doing it. And then there was the recent case of a British teenager, Danny Bowman, who was taking up to 200 selfies a day and admitted that it had become a “mission to get approval.” Bowman’s treating psychiatrist said that his compulsion to take selfies wasn’t a matter of vanity, rather a symptom of Bowman’s body dysmorphic disorder and depression.

The real issue at heart with the growing trend of taking selfies and other “acting out” behaviors via social media is more so about evolving technology and how social trends can be a platform for people with under-the-surface mental issues.

And that’s what’s so perfectly ironic about this hoax: it demonstrates just that. It’s a situation in which social media was used as the vehicle by which the silly notion that the taking of selfies was in and of itself a mental disorder.

There is a distinction, however, and that is this: an obsession with and compulsion to take selfies is more likely a specific manifestation of an underlying psychological disorder – one of perhaps many situations in which social media play a growing role.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse, addiction, or body dysmorphic disorder, please call toll-free 1-800-777-9588.

Sources:

http://adobochronicles.com/2014/04/06/update-apa-defends-use-of-selfitis-terminology/

http://demyx.com/blog/view/13670/american-psychiatric-association-makes-it-official-%E2%80%98selfie%E2%80%99-a-mental-disorder#.U0MLeZ3D-Uk

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/really-american-psychiatric-association-declare-selfie-disorder-221228.html


4 Ways Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction

Posted on April 8, 2014 By

4 Ways Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction

There is basically one similarity between female sex addiction and male sex addiction, which that neither men nor women sex and love addicts understand how to be intimate. That is, intimacy is lacking in their relationships. On the other hand, there are several major ways that female sex and love addicts are different from male sex addicts. This list may shed some light on recognizing the excessive behaviors that can be signs of an actual addiction. Here are 4 ways female sex addiction is different from male sex addiction.

#1. Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction in What it Looks Like

Generally speaking in male sex addiction, there is a tendency to objectify their partners. Men sex addicts seem to prefer sexual behavior that involves little, if any, emotional connection; therefore leading male sex addicts to be more likely to engage sexual activities, such as voyeuristic sex, exploitative sex, buying prostitutes, and having anonymous sex.

On the other hand, women sex addicts are more likely to use sex for power, control, and attention. This becomes evident in how they score high on measures regarding fantasy sex, seductive role-play sex, trading sex, and pain exchange.

#2. Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction in the Development of the Sex Addiction

Men’s sexuality seems to be a seemingly logical extension of what they’ve been taught. Our culture awards autonomy and competition, especially for male members of society, for example, getting ahead, ‘going for the gold,’ being an individual, being in control of feelings, keeping score of sexual encounters (“another notch in the belt”). When taken to the extreme, these values translate in extreme isolation, objectifying sex partners, difficulty expressing feelings, and a strong sense of entitlement at the expense of others. All of these are perfect factors for developing a sex addiction.

Female sex addicts, however, don’t seem develop their sex addiction as an intensified extension of cultural trends, like their male counterparts do. Instead, women sex addicts seem to be acting out sexually, as if in reaction to or in spite of culturally prescribed norms.

#3. Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction: Sex Addiction and Sexual Codependency

In her book, Women, Sex, and Addiction: A Search For Love and Power, Charlotte Kasl asserts that women are primarily trained to be ‘sexual codependents,’ which she defines such codependency as letting one’s body to be used in order to keep a relationship going, even if she doesn’t really want to have sex. The main distinction between sex addicts and sexual codependents is that sex addicts tend to use relationships in order to have sex, whereas sexual codependents use sex in order to hold onto relationships. Therefore in general, women are better described as sexual codependents and men, sex addicts.

#4. Female Sex Addiction is Different From Male Sex Addiction: Autonomy vs. Self-Identification

Author Carol Gilligan describes how women get their sense of identity from their relationships, in her groundbreaking work In a Different Voice, through something she calls the development of an “ego-in-context-of-relating.”

This differs greatly from male developmental theorists like Freud and Erikson, who asserted that there is a need among human beings to become autonomous, a model they based on themselves and then projected them onto women.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-777-9588.

Source:

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/06/01/how-are-female-sex-addicts-different-from-males/

 

 


3 Signs We’re Headed for a Truce in the War on Drugs

Posted on April 7, 2014 By

3 Signs We’re Headed for a Truce in the War on Drugs

If you’re following along with the latest trends in the news and other media, it’s obvious that we’re clearly moving in the right direction – a drug policy that is progressive and proactive that is decidedly more rational. Finally, it seems, we’re allowing science, compassion, health and human rights to guide our hand. There are several major signs that there is a shift in full-swing; here are 3 signs we’re headed for a truce in the ‘War on Drugs.’

3 Signs We’re Headed for a Truce in the War on Drugs: #1. More Americans See Need for Treatment, Not Jail Time

A recent poll reveals a major shift in the public’s attitude toward illegal drugs in the United States.

Two-thirds of Americans feel that people with substance abuse and addiction issues need access to treatment, and not criminal prosecution that could lead to jail time. The Pew Research Center found that those surveyed supported less harsh punishment for non-violent offenders, especially marijuana users.

Of those polled, 67% said they supported treatment for drug users versus the 26% who said the government should continue their efforts with prosecution. Seven percent said they didn’t know what to focus on.

“The public appears ready for a truce in the long-running war on drugs,” Pew researchers wrote.

3 Signs We’re Headed for a Truce in the War on Drugs: #2. Even Politicians Are Saying No to the ‘War on Drugs’

…And they’re winning. Politicians, whose status is quite influential when it comes to policy-making, are supporting the decriminalization of marijuana, in a clear sign that the stance on the war on drugs in the political arena is changing.

Here are some examples:

  • The trend to take a hard stance on drugs began to wane in 2012 with campaigning politicians speaking out against the drug war while still winning elections.
  • Beto O’Rourke, a supporter of the legalization of marijuana, defeated eight-term incumbent Sylvestre Reyes, a steadfast supporter of the war on drugs, in the Democratic primary for one of Texas’s congressional districts.
  • Chicago mayor and former White House chief of staff Rahm Emmanuel, also supports the decriminalization of marijuana.
  • New York Governor Andrew Cuomo supports the decriminalization of marijuana.
  • Ellen Rosenblum won a (surprising) victory over the favorite, Dwight Holton, in the Democratic primary for attorney general in Oregon, a race during which medical marijuana became a major issue.
  • Presidents of Latin American countries are calling for an end to the ‘drug war.’ Both former and current heads of state in Latin America are demanding that policy options be expanded to include alternatives that reduce prohibition-related crime (drug-related crime), violence and corruption in their own countries, They are also insisting that decriminalization and legal regulation of illicit drug markets be considered.

3 Signs We’re Headed for a Truce in the War on Drugs: #3. Artists and Media are Getting Involved and Using Their Influence

Award-Winning Films are taking on the racist aspects of the War on Drugs and are calling on world leaders to speak out.

Two examples are the critically acclaimed films are Eugene Jarecki’s The House I Live In and Breaking the Taboo, a film narrated by Morgan Freeman. Jarecki’s House is a brutal attack on the racist drug war and has won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Celebrities such as Brad Pitt, Danny Glover, Russell Simmons and John Legend were involved in the project, which has been well-received – yielding a slew of interviews and articles in with the likes of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Charlie Rose, and the CBS Early Show.

Breaking the Taboo takes a critical look at the war on drugs – on a global scale – and how it has failed. The documentary follows the Global Commission on Drug Policy on a mission to break the political taboo over the United States-led war on drugs and expose what it calls the biggest failure of global policy in the last 40 years. The filmmakers are also considering a novel distribution plan by releasing it through Google and YouTube for free. Their plan is to reach millions of people around the world by encouraging them to watch the documentary. In the span of less than a week, it was viewed more than 260,000 times and has generated worldwide press on CNN, BBC, Time magazine, Newsweek and more.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-777-9588.

Sources:

http://news.yahoo.com/majority-americans-want-treat-not-jail-drug-users-180951499.html

http://www.salon.com/2012/12/16/9_signs_the_war_on_drugs_is_almost_over/